Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope
Fermi's Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor
wins 2018 Rossi Prize
Fermi GBM's Dr. Colleen Wilson-Hodge with neutron-star merger
Congratulations to Dr. Colleen Wilson-Hodge and the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor team! The High-Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society has awarded them the 2018 Rossi Prize for their discovery of gamma rays coincident with a neutron-star merger gravitational wave event, confirming that short gamma-ray bursts are produced by binary neutron-star mergers.

What is Fermi?

General Dynamics C4 Systems - Artist Concept of Fermi The Universe is home to numerous exotic and beautiful phenomena, some of which can generate almost inconceivable amounts of energy. Supermassive black holes, merging neutron stars, streams of hot gas moving close to the speed of light ... these are but a few of the marvels that generate gamma-ray radiation, the most energetic form of radiation, billions of times more energetic than the type of light visible to our eyes. What is happening to produce this much energy? What happens to the surrounding environment near these phenomena? How will studying these energetic objects add to our understanding of the very nature of the Universe and how it behaves?

The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly GLAST, is opening this high-energy world to exploration and helping us answer these questions. With Fermi, astronomers at long last have a superior tool to study how black holes, notorious for pulling matter in, can accelerate jets of gas outward at fantastic speeds. Physicists are able to study subatomic particles at energies far greater than those seen in ground-based particle accelerators. And cosmologists are gaining valuable information about the birth and early evolution of the Universe.

For this unique endeavor, one that brings together the astrophysics and particle physics communities, NASA has teamed up with the U.S. Department of Energy and institutions in France, Germany, Japan, Italy and Sweden. General Dynamics was chosen to build the spacecraft. Fermi was launched June 11, 2008 at 12:05 pm EDT.

Latest News

Mar 16, 2018

Fermi Friday: Behind the Scenes

To understand black holes at the centers of distant galaxies, scientists combine Fermi data with information from other wavebands. By viewing these objects in the radio, we can see how their jets change over time.
+ Read More

Mar 09, 2018

Fermi Friday: Tech Talk

Scientists monitoring Active Galactic Nuclei need to know when one of them starts to flare. As an all-sky scanning instrument, Fermi is often the first to detect activity. Find out how the data gets to scientists quickly to allow for rapid multi-wavelength observations.
+ Read More

Mar 02, 2018

Fermi Friday: AGN Month!

What are Active Galacti Nuclei, and why are they so interesting to Fermi scientists? Find out more about these giant, powerful, and numerous gamma-ray objects.
+ Read More

Feb 15, 2018

New Femi Science Tools Release

The FSSC is pleased to announce the availability of a new version of the Fermi Science Tools, developed jointly with the Large Area Telescope Collaboration and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor Team. The tools can be downloaded at https://fermi.gsfc.nasa.gov/ssc/data/analysis/software/

» Full News Archive
» RSS Feed