Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

The Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC) runs the guest investigator program, creates and maintains the mission time line, provides analysis tools for the scientific community, and archives and serves the Fermi data. This web site is the portal to Fermi for all guest investigators.

This view shows the entire sky at energies greater than 1 GeV based on five years of data from the LAT instrument on NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Brighter colors indicate brighter gamma-ray sources.
This view shows the entire sky at energies greater than 1 GeV based on five years of data from the LAT
instrument on NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Brighter colors indicate brighter gamma-ray sources.
Image Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration

Look into the "Resources" section for finding schedules, publications, useful links etc. The "Proposals" section is where you will be able to find the relevant information and tools to prepare and submit proposals for guest investigator projects. At "Data" you will be able to access the Fermi databases and find the software to analyse them. Address all questions and requests to the helpdesk in "Help".

Fermi Observations for MW 598

Mission week 598 starts with a continuation of the modified sine profile from the previous week. This has an amplitude of -50 degrees during spacecraft day. During spacecraft night the rock is fixed at + 50 degrees. At 01:48 on day of year 318 (Nov 14)) there is a 10 minute freeze observation during which a new modified sine rocking profile is loaded. This continues until the end of the week. Note that positive rock angles are south, and negative rock angles are north.

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Latest News

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Sep 20, 2019

9th International Fermi Symposium

Please join us in Johannesburg, South Africa March 29-April 3 for the next Fermi Symposium. Abstracts are due November 1st. More information can be found on the Symposium Webpage.

Aug 15, 2019

Moon Glows Brighter Than Sun in Images From NASA's Fermi

If our eyes could see gamma rays, the Moon would appear brighter than the Sun! That's how NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has seen our neighbor in space for the past decade. These gamma-ray observations are a reminder that astronauts on the Moon will require protection from the same cosmic rays that produce this high-energy gamma radiation.
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Aug 5, 2019

Fermi Returns to Normal Operations

Friday night 8/2/19: The Fermi flight operations has returned the observatory to normal sky-survey mode and science operations have been resumed. The situation will continue to be carefully monitored.

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