Fermi Science Support Center

The Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC) runs the guest investigator program, creates and maintains the mission time line, provides analysis tools for the scientific community, and archives and serves the Fermi data. This web site is the portal to Fermi for all guest investigators.

This view shows the entire sky at energies greater than 1 GeV based on five years of data from the LAT instrument on NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Brighter colors indicate brighter gamma-ray sources.
This view shows the entire sky at energies greater than 1 GeV based on five years of data from the LAT
instrument on NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Brighter colors indicate brighter gamma-ray sources.
Image Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration

Look into the "Resources" section for finding schedules, publications, useful links etc. The "Proposals" section is where you will be able to find the relevant information and tools to prepare and submit proposals for guest investigator projects. At "Data" you will be able to access the Fermi databases and find the software to analyse them. Address all questions and requests to the helpdesk in "Help".

Fermi Observations for MW 489

Mission Week 489 starts with a brief continuation of the regular 50 degree rocking profile survey from MW488. After a 10 minute "freeze" observation an updated survey profile is loaded which continues for the remainder of MW488.

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Latest News

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Oct 16, 2017

Fermi's GBM Spots Merging Neutron Stars

At 12:41 UT on August 17, 2017, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope automatically triggered on a gamma-ray burst and classified it correctly, just as it does about 240 times per year. This particular trigger, however, had a unique friend: a near-simultaneous gravitational-wave detection from the LIGO-Virgo global network of interferometers.
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Sep 05, 2017

'Extreme' Telescopes Find the Second-fastest-spinning Pulsar

By following up on mysterious high-energy sources mapped out by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, the Netherlands-based Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) radio telescope has identified a pulsar spinning at more than 42,000 revolutions per minute, making it the second-fastest known.
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Jul 18, 2017

Gamma-ray Telescopes Reveal a High-energy Trap in Our Galaxy's Center

A combined analysis of data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.), a ground-based observatory in Namibia, suggests the center of our Milky Way contains a "trap" that concentrates some of the highest-energy cosmic rays, among the fastest particles in the galaxy.
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